Trump EPA order sets off national parks tweets about climate change

Coastal Redwood trees dwarf visitors at Muir Woods National Monument in California. Several national parks have tweeted about climate change, since the Trump administration ordered the EPA to remove climate change info from its website

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Coastal Redwood trees dwarf visitors at Muir Woods National Monument in California. Several national parks have tweeted about climate change, since the Trump administration ordered the EPA to remove climate change info from its website

Redwood National and State Parks is the latest national park to use social media to make a comment on climate change.

The tweet from the Northern California park about how the region’s famous Redwood and Sequoia trees could help battle climate change follows the Trump administration’s order to remove all climate change information from the Environmental Protection Agency’s website.

Redwood NPS also posted similar info on its Facebook page, which said it is run by the National Park Service, asking viewers if they realized “that old growth redwood groves capture more carbon per acre than any other habitat on the planet.” The post continued, “Studies show that more than 200 tons of carbon are held in each acre of these groves.”

The park’s social media posts follow tweets earlier this week from Badlands National Park, which have since been deleted, on climate change facts. The park said a former employee was responsible for the tweets.

The president is ultimately the head of the National Park Service, because it’s part of the Department of the Interior. That’s worrisome for environmentalists because President Donald Trump has called climate change a “hoax” before, and picked a cabinet and administration that are on record as denying the science behind global warming and climate change.