Americans subdue attacker on international train: 6 things you need to know

1. Two American military members, an American college student and a British man all helped prevent "an act of barbaric violence" on board a train traveling from Amsterdam to Paris Friday evening, a French official said.

2. Of the three Americans, one was an active member of the Air Force, another an inactive National Guard member and the third is a college student, according to news reports. A British man living in France, Chris Norman, also helped.

In an interview with Reuters, Aleck Skarlatos of the Oregon National Guard said he and Airman 1st Class Spencer Stone did not hesitate to approach and thwart the attacker when he brandished a machine gun on the train. Stone ran 10 meters to subdue the attacker and assumed the highest risk of being shot and killed, his friend said. 

American college student Anthony Sadler said he and the two American service members wrestled with the attacker, eventually taking away the box cutter and rifle. Sadler said he and Norman worked together to tie the suspect down while Stone helped an injured passenger and Skarlatos gained control of the gun.

3. Stone suffered a cut on his neck and almost lost his thumb, Norman said in an interview. His injuries are not life threatening and he is being treated. Three people were injured in total. Stone also helped a passenger who was bleeding severely while bleeding himself, Sadler said. 

4. The "two American passengers who were courageous," prevented a much more serious attack, French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve said.

5. President Obama received word of the Americans' heorics Friday. 

"Echoing the statements of French authorities, the president expressed his profound gratitude for the courage and quick thinking of several passengers, including U.S. service members, who selflessly subdued the attacker," a White House official said.

6. French officials identified the attacker as a 26-year-old Moroccan man named Sliman Hamzi.

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