AJC Sepia HBCU of the Week: North Carolina Central University - A History

North Carolina Central University was founded in 1909 as the National Religious Training School and Chautauqua by Dr. James Edward Shepard. It became the first public liberal arts institution for African Americans in the nation. The University is now a master’s comprehensive institution that offers bachelors and master’s degrees, a Juris Doctor, and a Ph.D. in Integrated Biosciences to a diverse student population.
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North Carolina Central University was founded in 1909 as the National Religious Training School and Chautauqua by Dr. James Edward Shepard. It became the first public liberal arts institution for African Americans in the nation. The University is now a master’s comprehensive institution that offers bachelors and master’s degrees, a Juris Doctor, and a Ph.D. in Integrated Biosciences to a diverse student population.

Credit: Photos courtesy NCCU University Relations

Credit: Photos courtesy NCCU University Relations

AJC Sepia HBCU of the Week is an occasional series that looks at Historically Black Colleges and Universities


NORTH CAROLINA CENTRAL UNIVERSITY: FAST FACTS

  1. North Carolina Central University was opened as the National Religious Training School and Chautauqua for the Colored Race in 1910 in Durham, which was evolving into an economic, education and social center for African-Americans
  2. NCCU is the country's first public liberal arts higher education institution created specifically for African-Americans.
  3. NCCU has two state-of-the-art biotechnology research facilities, the Julius L. Chambers Biomedical/Biotechnology Research Institute (BBRI), and `The Golden Leaf Foundation Biomanufacturing Research Institute and Technology Enterprise (BRITE), which collaborate with pharmacy and biotech companies in nearby Research Triangle Park. (BRITE) is the nation's largest college- or university-based drug-discovery lab, with some 500,000 compounds on site.
  4. NCCU's Department of History – which has produced more African-American graduates who have gone on to earn a Ph.D. in history than any other HBCU in the country – was honored with the Equity Award from the American Historical Association in 2014.
  5. North Carolina Central University students gave more than 237,000 volunteer hours to assist organizations and agencies in the Triangle region of North Carolina during the 2014-15 academic year, a contribution worth nearly $5.1 million to the local economy.
  6. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching classified NCCU in 2015 as a "Community Engaged Campus."
  7. NCCU's School of Law consistently is ranked by National Jurist magazine as one of the top 10 law schools in the nation for its high percentage of students gaining hands-on legal experience before graduation.
  8. The Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Ally (LGBTA) Center opened April 9, 2013, making our campus the second HBCU in the nation to dedicate a center to the LGBT community and the first HBCU in North Carolina to do so.
  9. The School of Library and Information Sciences is one of the five most diverse programs in Library and Information Sciences in the nation and the only program of its type at a historically black college or university.
  10. The Institute for Homeland Security and Workforce Development is known nationally for its emergency preparedness training for rural communities, faith communities and economically disadvantaged groups.
  11. NCCU's Department of Nursing has been recognized as one of the top nursing programs in the country by The Nurse Journal, ranking 13th out of 1,189 nursing programs in the eastern United States.
  12. NCCU is ninth among 100 Historically Black Colleges and Universities rated by College Choice, an independent online publication for college-bound students and their families.
  13. U.S. News & World Report named NCCU as the third-highest rated public HBCU in the country, and second-highest among all North Carolina HBCUs.

In 1910, Dr. James E. Shepard, a Durham pharmacist and religious educator, opened the National Religious Training School and Chautauqua for the Colored Race and declared its purpose to be “the development in young men and women of the character and sound academic training requisite for real service to the nation.”

The institution struggled financially in its early years.

In 1915, it was sold and reorganized, then becoming the National Training School. In 1923, the state legislature appropriated funds to buy the school, and renamed it the Durham State Normal School. Two years later, the legislature converted the institution into the North Carolina College for Negroes, dedicating it to liberal arts education and the preparation of teachers and principals. The college thus became the nation’s first state-supported liberal arts college for black students.

In 1939, the college offered its first graduate-level courses in the arts and sciences. The School of Law opened in 1940, followed in 1941 by the School of Library Science. In 1947, the legislature changed the name to North Carolina College at Durham. Shepard served as president until his death in 1947. Dr. Alfonso Elder was installed in 1948 as his successor.

North Carolina College at Durham became North Carolina Central University in 1969. On July 1, 1972, all the state’s public four-year colleges and universities were joined to become the Consolidated University of North Carolina. As part of the transition, the chief executive’s title changed from president to chancellor.

Dr. Albert N. Whiting presided over the transition, leading the university from 1967 until 1983. He was succeeded by Dr. LeRoy T. Walker, vice chancellor for university relations and an internationally renowned track and field coach. Dr. Tyronza R. Richmond succeeded Walker in 1986; Richmond’s tenure saw the establishment of the School of Education.

In 1993, Dr. Julius L. Chambers, a noted civil rights attorney, became the first NCCU alumnus to lead the university. He launched a major capital effort that led to construction of a biomedical/biotechnology research institute and a new School of Education building.

Dr. James H. Ammons became chancellor in June 2001, eight months after state voters approved a major bond issue for UNC system capital improvements. NCCU was among the campuses targeted for growth, and under Ammons’ leadership the university experienced a surge in enrollment.

Dr. Charlie Nelms succeeded Ammons in 2007. During his five-year tenure, he emphasized student success and focused on improving retention and graduation rates. Nelms presided over NCCU’s centennial celebration during the 2009-10 year. Under his leadership, NCCU was ranked as the nation’s No. 1 public historically black university by U.S. News & World Report for two consecutive years.

Nelms retired in 2012, and was succeeded on an interim basis by Charles L. Becton, a prominent attorney and former judge on the North Carolina Court of Appeals. He served until August 2013.

Dr. Debra Saunders-White began as the 11th chancellor of NCCU on June 1, 2013.

Saunders-White has established a platform of “Eagle Excellence,” or “E-squared.”

Her priorities for ensuring student success and academic excellence include: retaining and graduating students in four years; raising critical scholarship funds; and providing innovative academic instruction that prepares and trains students to work in the global marketplace.

At NCCU, Chancellor Saunders-White is creating "techno-scholars," or technology trendsetters and leaders who understand how technology intersects with all disciplines—from STEM to the liberal arts, social sciences, business, education, law and nursing.

When James E. Shepard opened the university in 1910, only a handful of students attended. Today, more than 8,155 students attend the university with more than 1,700 of them enrolled in graduate or professional programs.

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