Emory to remain test-optional for 2022 admissions

"The global coronavirus pandemic continues to impact the availability of SAT and ACT testing for many students,” says John Latting, dean of undergraduate admission. “We do not want students to feel pressured to take exams if they can’t do it near home and in a safe environment.” JASON GETZ / JGETZ@AJC.COM
"The global coronavirus pandemic continues to impact the availability of SAT and ACT testing for many students,” says John Latting, dean of undergraduate admission. “We do not want students to feel pressured to take exams if they can’t do it near home and in a safe environment.” JASON GETZ / JGETZ@AJC.COM

Applicants will not have to submit an ACT or SAT score to be considered

Emory University announced today it will extend its test optional policy for applicants who plan to enroll as freshmen and transfer students in the fall of 2022.

“The global coronavirus pandemic continues to impact the availability of SAT and ACT testing for many students,” says John Latting, dean of undergraduate admission. “We do not want students to feel pressured to take exams if they can’t do it near home and in a safe environment.”

“We continue to be committed to the thoughtful, student-centered practices that have guided our work for decades,” says Kelley Lips, dean of enrollment services for Oxford College. “A student’s full potential is the joy we seek to understand each year.”

According to a statement from Emory:

The policy applies to first-year and transfer students applying to both entry points for the university: Emory College of Arts and Sciences and Oxford College, and it applies to all decision plans, including early decision, regular decision, and for consideration of all merit scholarships, including membership in any of Emory’s Scholar Programs.

Highlights of Emory’s test policy for 2021-22 include:

· Submitting standardized test scores is completely optional.

· Students will not have to justify or disclose why they are not submitting scores.

· Students will not be disadvantaged in the review process if they do not submit scores.

Emory is taking a second year to examine its selection process, study indicators of academic promise, and assess how to further advance equity, access and the diversity of the student community. A decision for future application years has not yet been made.

While test scores have been part of Emory’s evaluation process in the past, scores represent only one component of the comprehensive admission review process. The admission committee also looks at an applicant’s personal statements, short answer questions, letters of recommendation, high school transcript, and where available, feedback from the Alumni Interview Program.

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