Health Care Law

It is a historic day at the White House as President Obama signs into law a Senate health care bill, the biggest piece of health legislation since the approval of Medicare in the late 1960's. 

What is different about this bill signing is that it really signals the start of the next round of battling over the reconciliation bill, which would make a series of changes in the plan that will be approved by the President.

Both parties warmed up for the showdown Monday on the Senate floor, as Republican Leader Mitch McConnell flatly declared, "Enough is enough!" when it comes to another health care bill.

"Americans said they didn't want this bill, " McConnell said.  "Democrats passed it anyway."

Over in the House yesterday, it was hard to tell that the health care debate had wrapped up on Sunday night with a pair of victories for Democrats, as Republicans trooped to the floor to denounce the effort.

Several House Republicans even introduced bills to repeal the new-law-that-still-wasn't-even-a-law-yet, since it will be signed by President Obama today.

"Effective as of the enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, such Act is repealed, and the provisions of law amended or repealed by such Act are restored or revived, as if such Act had not been enacted," read the language.

"We will not allow this to stand," said Rep. Michelle Bachmann (R-MN), who introduced a repeal measure along with others.

Bachmann's speech pushed one Democrat to grab the lectern and return rhetorical fire, just like the health care debate was still raging from Sunday night.

"It's time to chill out, Republicans!" said Rep. Bob Filner (D-CA).  "Let this bill work.  Let our constituents finally get health care."

President Obama will deliver on exactly that on this Tuesday, capping a drive that began with President Teddy Roosevelt in the early 20th century.

"In the end, what this day represents is another stone, firmly laid in the foundation of the American dream," said the President on Sunday night after House approval of the two health care measures.

It was a speech that many Presidents of both parties had hoped to give after action by the Congress on major health care legislation.  Mr. Obama will now see if he can do it twice within a week with Senate approval of the fix-it-reconciliation bill.

It is a historic day at the White House as President Obama signs into law a Senate health care bill, the biggest piece of health legislation since the approval of Medicare in the late 1960's.  What is different about this bill signing is that it really signals the start of ...

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