Readers write: April 1

Readers write: April 1

TRAFFIC CONGESTION

‘No turn on red’ sign protects pedestrians

A recent “Take to Task” column included an item about the “no right turn on red” sign at the intersection of southbound Monroe Drive and 10th Street (“Sign causing backup,” Metro, March 25).

The article contains a quote from Warren Bice: “This is a very busy intersection, and there is absolutely no need for this inconvenience.”

When the AJC reports about this issue again, I encourage you to explain the importance to pedestrian safety of the “no right turn on red” restriction at this intersection. Due to the opening of the Eastside Trail, this intersection has a lot of pedestrian traffic. When southbound motorists are stopped, pedestrians crossing east and west have the walk light — yet motorists turning right on red rarely look to their passenger side. In addition, 10th Street dead ends at Monroe Drive, so many motorists would also not look to the left.

Streets have many purposes, only one of which is moving cars.

SALLY FLOCKS, PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, PEDS

 

EMORY CONTROVERSY

Don’t deprive students who’d eat more chicken

I would like to respond to the proud father of the gay son who commented on the potential removal of Chick-fil-A from the Emory campus (“Emory students right to sanction Chick-fil-A,” Readers write, Opinion, March 25).

My question is, how does this help his son? It surely does not help Emory if there are fewer choices for students to go to eat.

For the Emory students who do not want to eat at Chick-fil-A, that is their choice, but why take that choice away from everyone? If I went to Emory, I would eat at Chick-fil-A every day. They have good food.

THOMAS T. BRAYTON, SHARPSBURG

 

AFGHANISTAN

War didn’t work; time to try something new

As the United States begins to withdraw from Afghanistan, it’s worthwhile to consider statistics provided by the Congressional Research Service in April 2012.

Based on those figures, the U.S. had, by the spring of 2012, already spent more than $59,000 on each Afghan family. That amount of money could have bought machinery for farmers; college educations for young people; medical and health developments for entire villages, and a standard of living beyond the wildest dreams of most Afghans. Instead, the money was spent on a war that most Americans have come to oppose, which has apparently accomplished almost nothing.

Clearly, war was not the answer. Perhaps it’s time to try another way.

SYLVIA KREBS, DOUGLASVILLE

 

SUPREME COURT

Justices right to shift power back to states

I am shocked to read that the Supreme Court may consider the issues of marriage and child welfare the proper guardianship of the states, not the massive bureaucracy in Washington, D.C.

Perhaps the Supreme Court should re-emphasize the declared rights of states in more matters — like gun control and health care laws. Let the majority of people in New York, Chicago and other places ban guns and even ammo. Let other states hold binding referendums on what citizens wish to live by.

The Obama administration needs a sharp slap to remind it to stop trampling on states’ rights.

CHARLES R. THOMAS, CUMMING

Weather and Traffic