The DeKalb County Department of Watershed Management is overseeing the work this summer.

DeKalb plans to replace decades-old pipes after reports of low water pressure

DeKalb County is pouring $20 million into a project that will replace seven miles of aging water pipes in the hopes of increasing water pressure in the area, officials said.

The 60- to 100-year-old water pipes caused residents in the Briarcliff and North Decatur areas to report low water pressure, according to a statement from the county.

The project is scheduled to begin this July. The work includes installing high-capacity water mains along Briarcliff that are a foot in diameter. That could lead to some disruptions in traffic, the county said.

DeKalb is also reactivating a water tower on Clairmont Road to help increase the water supply and pressure.


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“Resolving water pressure issues in the Briarcliff and North Decatur area is a top priority for DeKalb County Government,” CEO Michael Thurmond said in a statement. “DeKalb County is committed to fixing these longstanding problems and has directed significant resources to get the job done.”

Until the low water pressure issues are fixed, the county said, customers in the area should not use water outdoors — including filling swimming pools, watering plants and washing cars — from 5 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day. The county did not say how long the construction work could last.

Residents who experience low water pressure are asked to contact the Department of Watershed Management at 770-270-6243 or dekalbwaterops@dekalbcountyga.gov

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