This detail from the "Advent" window at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta is by the Tiffany studio and depicts Mary and baby Jesus.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

The stained glass windows of First Presbyterian Church

Some of Atlanta's most beautiful artwork can be found behind its churches' sanctuary doors. As part of an occasional series spotlighting the city's stained glass treasures, today we introduce the "History Windows" of First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta, next door to the High Museum on Peachtree Street. 

First Presbyterian was founded in 1848, only three years after Marthasville took the name "Atlanta." The church moved to its current Midtown address in 1915 and began installing its large stained glass windows in 1919. 

The windows were created by the top studios of the day — Tiffany, D'Ascenzo and Willet. There are 20 windows in all but today we'll just focus on the ten large "History Windows" that depict events from the Bible. Each window is in three sections and is crowned by a unique mansion design at the top. Not shown in these photos are the impressive triplet windows underneath each large history window. To see those, you'll have to visit. 

You can learn more about the windows at this catalog provided by the church. Check First Presbyterian's website for information about visiting. And check out our previous spotlight on the windows of Druid Hills Presbyterian Church

Photos by Pete Corson. Many thanks to First Presbyterian Church for making their sanctuary available.


Abrahamic Covenant

The "Abrahamic Covenant" window at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta was created by Tiffany and depicts Abraham receiving the Covenant.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

The first window was created by Tiffany and depicts Abraham receiving the Covenant. Below is a detail of Abraham's face.

A detail of the "Abrahamic Covenant" window at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

Laws, Psalms & Prophets

The "Laws, Psalms & Prophets" window at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta. This window was executed by D'Ascenzo and depicts characters from the Old Testament. From left to right, that's Moses, David with his lyre, and the prophet Isaiah.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

This window was executed by D'Ascenzo and depicts characters from the Old Testament. From left to right, that's Moses, David with his lyre, and the prophet Isaiah.


Advent

The "Advent" window at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta is by Tiffany and depicts Mary, Joseph and baby Jesus in the stable.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

This window by Tiffany depicts Mary, Joseph and baby Jesus in the stable. See a detail of Mary at the top of this page.


Jesus’ Ministry

The "Jesus' Ministry" window at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta is by D'Ascenzo and shows Jesus preaching in a field.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

This window by D'Ascenzo shows Jesus preaching in a field.


The Passion

The "Passion" window at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta is by Tiffany and shows Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane in the moments before his arrest.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

The window by Tiffany shows Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane in the moments before his arrest. Read more about the artist's decision to depict this scene rather than the crucifixion.


The Resurrection

The "Resurrection" window at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta is by Tiffany and was the first one installed at the church. It shows Jesus walking out of the tomb. On the left and right panels, Roman soldiers cower and disciples bear flowers.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

This window by Tiffany was the first one installed at the church. It shows Jesus walking out of the tomb. On the left and right panels, Roman soldiers cower and disciples bear flowers.


The Ascension

Another one by Tiffany, the "Ascension" window at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta shows Jesus in astral form gathering with his disciples.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

Another Tiffany window, this one showing Jesus in astral form gathering with his disciples. Below, a detail of Jesus' face and hands.

A detail of the "Ascension" window at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta, showing the face and hands of Jesus.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

Pentecost

The "Pentecost" window at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta is by D'Ascenzo and depicts the disciples welcoming a glowing dove that represents the Holy Spirit.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

This window by D'Ascenzo depicts the disciples welcoming a glowing dove that represents the Holy Spirit.


Martyrs

The "Martyrs" window at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta is by D'Ascenzo and depicts the stoning of Stephen outside the walls of Jerusalem. The men in the left and right panels are throwing the stones.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

This window by D'Ascenzo depicts the stoning of Stephen outside the walls of Jerusalem. The men in the left and right panels are throwing the stones. The detail below shows the drama in the faces — the beatific glow of Stephen and the meanness of his persecutors.

This detail of the "Martyrs" window at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta shows the drama in the faces and the beatific glow of Stephen and the meanness of his persecutors.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

Christian missions

The final history window, "Christian Missions," at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta is by Tiffany and depicts the spread of Christianity in the first centuries after the death of Jesus.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

The final history window is by Tiffany and depicts the spread of Christianity in the first centuries after the death of Jesus.


And as a bonus, here’s an image of the Great East Window. It’s also called the “Second Coming - Christ’s Return” window and the image is considered prophesy, so it’s not included among the ten history windows. It was created by Willet and depicts Christ descending from heaven as families on either side welcome him.

The "Christ's Return" window at First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta is not part of the ten-window history series, but is considered a prophesy image.
Photo: PETE CORSON / PCORSON@AJC.COM

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