Fred Korematsu received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, in 1998. He had resisted the government's attempt to intern Japanese Americans like himself during World War II.
Photo: HANDOUT
Photo: HANDOUT

Atlanta Forward: Leadership

Earlier this month, Georgia’s Asian-American community gathered at the state Capitol with Gov. Nathan Deal and other officials to observe Fred Korematsu Day — the man who refused to obey military orders to turn himself in for internment as a Japanese-American during World War II. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld Korematsu’s criminal conviction; one writer notes that the decision is dangerous  because it still stands. Another details how Korematsu ultimately was vindicated, and the lessons his case teaches us about civil rights and justice. Korematsu’s daughter tells  how her late father made a difference.  |  Click here to join the discussion


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