Caption

North Fulton lane shift makes way for new bridge on Arnold Mill Road

Motorists are taking a slightly different route on Arnold Mill Road at the Cherokee County border with Milton — because of a lane relocation that clears the way for key roadwork leading to a new bridge over the Little River.

Construction crews working on the bridge realigned the traffic lanes on the Cherokee County side in March to allow work to begin on new sections of roadway leading to the new bridge, according to the Georgia Department of Transportation.

The bridge project, scheduled for completion in November, will replace the 1952 bridge along a busy stretch of Arnold Mill Road / Ga. 140. Lanes were shifted  on March 15, along with new barriers and “road closed” signs on the old lane. Preparation work has now begun for what will be new road sections leading to the new bridge when it opens.

UPDATE Aug 20, 2018: Work has begun on a new road path leading to the new bridge. On Sunday, Aug. 19, the new approaches were still dirt, but work has been done to level and smooth the ground, making it look a bit more like the roadway it will become when the bridge is finished. Here’s a view of how it looked:

The bridge platform was in place and work had begun to smooth the ground where the new roadway will be built to connect Arnold Mill Road with the new bridge. Photo taken Aug. 19, 2018. (Brian O'Shea / bposhea@ajc.com)

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Arnold Mill Road construction from the other end of the bridge. Photo taken Aug. 5, 2018. (Brian O'Shea / bposhea@ajc.com)

BEFORE and AFTER: See a photo of the bridge before construction began, compared to how it looked in April 2018

When complete, the bridge will have two lanes 12 feet each, with a 10-foot shoulder, according to the DOT.

This bluff on the right side of the road has been leveled. This photo was taken on the Milton side. The bridge construction can be seen beyond the pickup truck. A construction crane is visible just above the bridge. (Brian O’Shea)

Another change that might be noticed by residents and regular commuters: excavation and leveling of land on the Milton side of the bridge. What had been a red-clay bluff that rose high above the right of the road as it approached the bridge has been leveled to just about even with the road.

Here is the current view of that same stretch of road taken on Sunday, April 8. The new bridge is to the right of the current one. ((Brian O'Shea / bposhea@ajc.com)) (Brian O'Shea / bposhea@ajc.com)

Work was done in 2017 to remove trees and brush along either side of the road and the existing bridge.

On the Cherokee County side, “road closed” signs block traffic from a section of the road that will be rebuilt to connect to the new bridge. A news release from Georgia DOT said the new bridge is expected to be completed in November 2018.

This section of Arnold Mill Road has been blocked to traffic so that work can begin on the road sections leading to the new bridge. This photo is west of the bridge on the Cherokee County side. The bridge construction can be seen near the far left of the photo. (Brian O’Shea)
A photo of the construction in late March 2018. Panoramic view is from the Milton side of the bridge. (Brian O’Shea)
A detailed look at the bridge base photographed in January 2018. (Brian O'Shea)

A detail of the current bridge showing a date of 1952.

Marker on the end of the bridge sets the date as 1952
Military Depot at the old Chadwick's store.

The nearest landmark to the new bridge is the Military Depot, located in the old Chadwick’s Store on the Milton side of the bridge. Because of the way city lines are drawn, the Military Depot is actually in the city of Roswell. The buildings and houses on the other side of the street are in the city of Milton.

The Arnold Mill Road / Ga. 140 bridge carries traffic above Little River. Close to this site was the location of the mill for which the road is named.

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