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Piccadilly in South DeKalb Mall fails inspection; cook ate on job

Editor’s note: This story has been updated to include a comment from the restaurant chain. 

During its recent inspection, a Piccadilly employee ate grapes while preparing fried fish, according a DeKalb County health inspection report. 

That was one of the many marks that led to the popular restaurant chain’s failed health score. 

The restaurant, located at 2801 Candler Road in Decatur, received a 67 — just three points shy of a passing score. 


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Other violations include: debris on food contact surfaces and macaroni noodles found in a prep sink filled with dirty utensils. The report does not state if the noodles were cooked. The inspector also noted the restaurant’s expired food permit was posted inside the business. 

“We are disappointed in our health inspection score from December 3rd,” Piccadilly spokesman Max Jordan said in an emailed statement to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

He said that all but three of items have already been corrected and they’re confident they’ll pass re-inspection.

“The Management team is taking this seriously and are committed to continuous improvement and maintaining appropriate standards at our DeKalb Mall location,” he said.

The eatery received and 81 and 82 on its previous two inspections in 2017. 


Piccadilly

2801 Candler Road

Decatur

Score: 67

Read the full inspection report here.


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In other news: 

The Deputy Director for Fulton County environmental health says the department works to educate workers about regulations, but won't shut them down unless imminent health risk exist.

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