Alpharetta Mayor Jim Gilvin announces re-election run
Photo: City of Alpharetta
Photo: City of Alpharetta

Alpharetta mayor announces he will run for re-election 

Alpharetta’s Mayor Jim Gilvin announced Wednesday, the one-year anniversary of his election, that he would run again in November.

Gilvin is running again so soon because he is finishing out the term of David Belle Isle, who resigned for an unsuccessful bid in the Georgia Secretary of State Republican primary. 

Gilvin told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution on Thursday that he always intended to run a second time to serve a full term.


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“I’ve done exactly what I’ve promised people I’d do. I’ve promised that I’d regain the balance that makes Alpharetta different from many cities in the state,” said Gilvin, who has been on the council since 2011.

He explained what that balance means to him: “Continuing to grow and evolve as times change. The business climate changes and what people want in a city while still retaining that small-town charm that makes Alpharetta a great place to live and do business.”

An example is Gilvin’s push to revitalize the corridor around the dated North Point Mall; the City Council in February approved a 24,000-square-foot mixed-use development attached to the mall.

The development was pitched as having lots of greenspace and bringing the aesthetics and shopping habits from inside the Perimeter to the city of 65,000 residents.


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“We know that the retail world is changing, and so in a corridor like that that is built primarily for big-box retails and stores, we got to make sure we are proactive,” he said.

The Macon native is a real estate agent with a wife, two children and a finance degree from Georgia Southern University. He moved to the city in 1998.


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