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Kentucky radio station plays 'Baby, It's Cold Outside' for 2 hours straight

A Kentucky radio station did not turn a cold shoulder to a classic Christmas song that has been receiving heated criticism.

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WAKY held a two-hour marathon, playing the 1944 hit “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” and four other versions of the song, defiantly bucking the trend of radio stations that have been pulling the tune from their playlists because of claims the song normalizes date rapeWLKY reported.

"I'm not sure why it's controversial," Joe Fredele, director of programming for WAKY, told the television station. "We've played this song for years, you know, this song is older than WAKY is."

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Last month, a Cleveland radio station removed the song from its playlist, saying that its lyrics may not be appropriate, particularly since the #MeToo movement began, WOIO reported.

>> ‘Baby, It’s Cold Outside’ removed from Ohio station’s playlist

"We really need to think about the impact that songs have, not just 'Baby, It's Cold Outside,' but numerous songs that we decide to play on the radio," Amy Turner, the director of sexual assault services at The Center for Women and Families, told WLKY.

The song, written by Frank Loesser, includes lyrics normally sung by a woman, including “Say, what’s in this drink?” and “I simply must go,” followed by the woman singing “The answer is no.”

>> Writer’s daughter says song is not about date rape

While Fredele said he supports the #MeToo movement, he is puzzled why “Baby, It’s Cold Outside” has been the target of criticism.

"This song is not about that. All it is, is a dialogue between a man and a woman, and at the end of the song, you hear them harmonize together, so they're agreeing basically," Fredele told WLKY. "It's just a fun way of saying, 'Hey this our vote for that song. It's a fun song. It's a romantic song, don't pick on it.’”

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