Here's a look at what will be on the ballot in Cobb County on Nov. 8. (Erica A. Hernandez/AJC)

Elections 2016: What is on the ballot for Cobb County?

Once you breeze past that easy old presidential section of your ballot, it's time to bring it on home to Cobb County.

None of the school board nor commissioner races are contested, but there's a lot to vote on this go-around. 

1,000 Cobb ballots cast in first 3 hours of presidential early voting

  • Democrat Stacey Evans is on the ballot vying to retain her position as state representative for the Smyrna area. The up-and-comer's name had been floated as a contender to replace Sam Olens as state attorney general following his move to president of Kennesaw State University. The AG's job was filled this week by former economic development director Chris Carr. Evans is running against Republican Matt Vaughn.
  • And, yes, the fact that there's no contested commission race isn't interesting, but how we got there is. Republican Mike Boyce has an easier go of it because incumbent chairman Tim Lee lost his reelection bid in July. It's thought that race was used as a way for residents to voice their opinions about the county's involvement in new Atlanta Braves stadium. Lee's legacy is courting the Braves to Cobb, which included promising $400 million in public money to build and maintain the new ballpark. He claimed the county would reap $1.2 billion from the deal. The team lost 93 games this year.
  • The issue of term limits for the Marietta City Council will also appear on the ballot. The question asks whether both the mayor and city council members should be limited to serving three consecutive terms of four years each. But don't vote expecting anything to change overnight — or at all. The nonbinding vote means city officials do not have to take any action no matter how strongly residents vote either way.

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