Apple s 2017 iPad Pros improve on already excellent drawing, video and photo capabilities, but its true potential won t be seen until iOS 11 hits later this year. (Sarah Tew/CNET/TNS)

CNET: Thinnest (and lightest) large tablets

Even if you only want your tablet to be powerful and pragmatic, you have to admit that a thin tablet has its advantages. Thin tablets, after all, are slimmer, sexier and easier to handle. Here are four of the most svelte tablets we’ve found.

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iPad Pro (10.5-inch, 2017)

Product Review: https://www.cnet.com/products/apple-ipad-pro-10-5-inch-2017/review/#ftag=CAD187281f

CNET rating: 4.5 stars out of 5 (Outstanding)

The good: Excellent display, upgraded storage options, faster processor, better cameras and a bigger display in a still-compact size — barely over a pound and barely under a quarter-inch thick. Faster refresh-rate display also means faster Apple Pencil responsiveness.

The bad: Most of the cool new software features require iOS 11, which isn’t coming until September. No newly imagined accessories and the ones you need (Pencil, keyboard) drive up the cost to laptop levels.

The cost: $649.00

The bottom line: Apple’s 2017 iPad Pros improve on already excellent drawing, video and photo capabilities, but its true potential won’t be seen until iOS 11 hits later this year.

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Sony Xperia Z4

Product Review: https://www.cnet.com/products/sony-xperia-z4-tablet/#ftag=CAD187281f

CNET rating: 4.0 stars out of 5 (Excellent)

The good: The Sony Xperia Z4’s slim, waterproof design (weighing in under a pound and measuring just less than a quarter-inch thick) is simultaneously sleek and solid. Running the latest version of Android, it features a colorful user-friendly overlay. It has a sharp HD screen, and its performance is fast and smooth.

The bad: The optional Bluetooth keyboard is cramped to type on and has a frail plastic build.

The cost: $649.00

The bottom line: For novice Android users with a desire to greatly personalize their experience, the Sony Xperia Z4 is a beautifully constructed tablet with high-end specs that won’t disappoint.

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Samsung Galaxy Tab S3

Product Review: https://www.cnet.com/products/samsung-galaxy-tab-s3-review/#ftag=CAD187281f

CNET rating: 4.0 stars out of 5 (Excellent)

The good: The Samsung Galaxy Tab S3 is an elegantly designed tablet that comes with a capable stylus. It has a stunning AMOLED screen, fingerprint sensor for extra security and satisfyingly loud quad speakers. It’s also the first HDR-ready tablet.

The bad: Despite the hype, HDR content is not available on the tablet yet. Large games take time to load. The keyboard add-on is an expensive extra.

The cost: $533.27 to $631.17

The bottom line: Samsung packs buzz-worthy features like S Pen and HDR support into its new premium Galaxy Tab S3, but without a keyboard packed in, it’s still more about content consumption than creation.

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Huawei Matebook

Product Review: https://www.cnet.com/products/huawei-matebook-review/#ftag=CAD187281f

CNET rating: 3.5 stars out of 5 (Very good)

The good: The Huawei Matebook fits a full Windows 10 PC into an iPad-sized tablet chassis. The fingerprint sensor is fast. Its screen and speakers are excellent.

The bad: You’ll get periodic pauses when launching applications or loading webpages, and battery life is merely OK. Huawei charges extra for the keyboard, stylus and dock you’ll need in order to use the Matebook like a PC.

The cost: $426.00

The bottom line: If you like what the Matebook offers, pick the slightly pricier Samsung Galaxy TabPro S instead. The TabPro S has an even better screen, better battery life and throws the keyboard in for free.

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The following CNET staff contributed to this story: Associate Editor Xiomara Blanco, Senior Editor Sean Hollister, Senior Editor Scott Stein and Senior Editor Laura K. Cucullu. For more reviews of personal technology products, please visit www.cnet.com.

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