What You Need To Know: Dr. Seuss

How well do you know Dr. Seuss?

Theodore Geisel was a lifelong cartoonist.

In honor of Geisel's birthday, March 2, is the National Education Association's Read Across America Day, when children across the country take part in reading events.

Best known as Dr. Seuss and for his line of children’s books, Geisel inked thoughtful artwork from high school through college, while working in advertising in New York before World War II and as a political cartoonist for two years during the war.

Horton might hear a Who; The grouchy guy eventually eats green eggs and ham and star-bellied Sneetches are just as good as those with none, but how well do you know Dr. Seuss?

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Geisel's first book “And to Think That I Saw it on Mulberry Street,” was rejected by 27 publishers before it was printed by Vanguard Press. He eventually wrote and illustrated 44 children’s books.

Over the course of his career, Geisel spent 15 years creating advertising campaigns for Standard Oil.

He was editor of The Jack-O-Lantern, a humor magazine at Dartmouth College. When he was thrown off staff after getting caught throwing a party that served alcohol (during Prohibition) he developed the nom de plume “Seuss” and continued contributing to the magazine.

In addition to cartooning in various mediums, Geisel was an accomplished sculptor.

Geisel's definitive work, “The Cat in the Hat,” was created with the directive from publisher Houghton Mifflin to use 225 “new reader” vocabulary words.

 Among his accolades, Geisel was honored with a Pulitzer Prize, two Oscars, two Emmys and a Peabody award.

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