In this photo illustration, water comes to the boil on a gas stove. The hot water challenge on YouTube is drawing concern from parents once again. (Photo by Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images)
Photo: Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images
Photo: Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images

Revival of so-called hot water challenge sparks warnings from parents

Parents across the country are warning others after a prank among teenagers in Indiana left a 15-year-old with second-degree burns

The hot water challenge consists of pouring boiling water on an unsuspecting friend or drinking boiling water through a straw and uploading video of the prank on the internet.

The challenge reportedly began online years ago, but the recent incident in Indiana  is drawing more attention to the prank.

Kyland Clark, 15, said skin fell off his chest and face after he and his friend looked up and tried the hot water challenge on YouTube, according to WXIN.

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“I looked down at my chest. My skin just fell off my chest, and then I looked in the mirror and I had skin falling off here and on my face,” Kyland told WXIN July 26.

WXIN reported that Kyland is expected to heal from his injuries, according to Fox 59, but Doctors in Indiana say they have seen an increase in emergency room visits from victims of the so-called challenge. 

“It’s suggesting to people that they can try it and they won’t be hurt, but they will be, I can guarantee it,” Dr. Ed Bartkus of Indiana University School of Medicine told WXIN.

In 2017, an 8-year-old girl in Florida died after drinking boiling water from a straw on a dare after watching a series of boiling water challenge videos on YouTube. 

That same year, an 11-year-old girl in New York City was burned on over 85 percent of her body when a friend poured boiling water on her while at a neighborhood block party. 

Alina Dow, who attended the party, told WPIX at the time that she hoped the 11-year-old girl’s recovery would inspire others. 

“Just to let the little girl know that she is supported and she has friends and this is not OK,” Dow said. 

More information on how to prevent hot water burns and scalds is on the United States Fire Administration website.

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