Police – Naked Man Found Doing Jumping Jacks in McDonald’s Restroom

Naked man found doing jumping jacks in McDonald’s restroom, police say

Brody Tyler Young, 25, was found doing jumping jacks – naked -- in a McDonald’s restroom. According to court records, he was charged with criminal trespass, public indecency and public intoxication. 

An affidavit filed in Davidson County said that Nashville police officers were called the afternoon of July 23 to a McDonald’s restaurant, where employees said a naked man had locked himself in the women’s restroom for most of the day. The officers made contact with Young, who was indeed naked and locked in a stall in the ladies’ room.

“Mr. Young was erratic and doing jumping jacks and hitting the wall,” the affidavit read. “When I asked him to stand up, Mr. Young smelled strongly of chemical fumes as if he had been huffing.”

Young had prior arrests for huffing, the court document said. Deemed a potential danger to himself and others because of his intoxication, he was arrested. 

He had been banned from the McDonald’s before because of his behavior, records said. 

Young was booked into the Davidson County Jail, where he was later released on bond. 

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Court records show that the day after his McDonald’s arrest, police officers were called to a Lowe’s Home Improvement store a couple of miles away from the McDonald’s, where witnesses said Young was acting erratically in the parking lot. When the officers arrived, they found Young behind the store’s customer service desk, trying to use the phone.

“According to store employees, the suspect had gone to the paint section and was spraying spray paint into a Gatorade bottle and huffing the paint,” an affidavit in that case read. “Officers located the bottle and the spray paint can on the desk next to the suspect.

“Both the suspect and the Gatorade bottle had a very heavy odor of spray paint.”

Young was still erratic and could not answer the officers’ questions clearly, the affidavit said. He was taken to Southern Hills Hospital and medically cleared before being booked once again into the Davidson County Jail. 

He was charged in the Lowes incident with inhalation of toxic vapors, public intoxication and unlawful use of drug paraphernalia, court records show

The records show that Young pleaded guilty to criminal trespass in the McDonald’s incident and inhalation of toxic vapors in the incident at Lowe’s. Davidson County Jail records indicate he is serving a 60-day sentence that began July 25. 

Young also had to be cleared medically before being charged July 3, 2017, for an incident in which he was seen inside a CVS pharmacy spraying starter fluid into a Gatorade bottle, putting the bottle to his mouth and breathing in the vapors. When officers approached him that day, he dropped the bottle and the can of starter fluid.

“The defendant was unable to stand on his own without stumbling due to the inhalant,” the affidavit reads

After his trip to the hospital, Young was charged with inhaling toxic fumes and public intoxication, court records show. 

He had several other arrests for charges related to huffing that year, according to the records. 

The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that drug users who abuse inhalants typically use solvents, gases and aerosol sprays, which can easily be found in the home or workplace, and which are easy to purchase in stores. The high obtained by huffing lasts just a few minutes, so those addicted to the high will inhale repeatedly over the span of hours. 

The short-term effects of huffing are similar to those of alcohol: slurred speech, dizziness and a lack of coordination, the Institute’s website said

Long-term effects include brain damage, delayed behavioral development in children and teens who huff, permanent loss of coordination or spasms caused by nerve damage, bone marrow damage, liver and kidney damage and hearing loss. 

An overdose of inhalants can cause seizures or stop a person’s heart. 

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