Daylight saving time 2021: Seven things to know about ‘springing forward’

Spring Forward: Daylight Saving

You may want to store up some extra sleep because you are about to lose an hour of it.

Come March 14 at 2 a.m. most of America will be “springing forward” as daylight saving time kicks in, giving us another hour of sunlight.

Here’s a look at seven things you may not have known about daylight saving time.

  1. Spring forward and fall back” is an easy way to remember how to set the clock when daylight saving times begins and ends. In Georgia, you set your clock forward one hour at 2 a.m. on March 14. You’ll set it back one hour at 2 a.m. on Nov. 7. (And if you wondering, the first day of Spring for 2021 is Saturday, March 20.
  2. In the United States, daylight saving time began on March 21, 1918. U.S. government officials reasoned that fuel could be saved by reducing the need for lighting in the home.
  3. Ancient agrarian civilizations used a form of daylight saving time, adjusting their timekeeping depending on the sun's activity.
  4. Many people call it daylight savings time. The official name is daylight saving time. No 's' on 'saving.'
  5. Benjamin Franklin came up with an idea to reset clocks in the summer months as a way to conserve energy.
  6. A standardized system of beginning and ending daylight saving time came in 1966 when the Uniform Time Act became law. While it was a federal act, states were granted the power to decide if they wanted to remain on standard time year-round.
  7. Arizona (except for the Navajo, who do observe daylight saving time on tribal lands), Hawaii, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands do not observe daylight saving time.

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