Voters will check in at their precincts with an iPad that scans their driver’s license or other form of photo ID when using the new Georgia voting machines. (Alyssa Pointer/alyssa.pointer@ajc.com)

Previously redacted Georgia election security document made public

The Georgia secretary of state’s office acknowledged Thursday that a vendor had improperly redacted a purchasing document detailing security features of the state’s new $107 million voting system.

The unredacted 143-page document was posted on the secretary of state’s website Thursday. The document, which explains “high level security” of the state’s new voting check-in iPads, doesn’t compromise the integrity of the system, according to the secretary of state’s office.

The document was made public “in the spirit of good governance and transparency” after the secretary of state’s office was alerted about the redactions, said Deputy Secretary of State Jordan Fuchs.

“Our new voting system, including new Poll Pads, are our most secure system to date,” Fuchs said.

The iPads will be provided by a company called KnowInk, which is working with Dominion Voting Systems to install the new voting technology statewide before the March 24 presidential primary.

The document says the iPads will prevent election interference through Apple’s operating system, which resists viruses and can be locked remotely. The document also outlines applications and components of the system.

“They’re just saying, ‘We use industry trends and services,’” said Mustaque Ahamad, associate director for Georgia Tech’s Institute for Information Security & Privacy. “I wouldn’t see any reason to not disclose that.”

The document doesn’t include passwords or keys that could be used to penetrate the iPads.

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