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Austin bombings: What we know about the bomber’s habits

Police and federal agents continue to investigate the four bomb explosions in Austin this month that killed two people and wounded four others.
At a press conference Monday, after the fourth bomb exploded injuring two men, law enforcement authorities asked the bomber to contact them and let them know what message he is trying to send, assuring him that they are “listening.”

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The bombings began March 2 when a package exploded on the front porch of the home of Anthony Stephan House, 39, killing him. The second attack happened March 12 when a bomb in a package was taken into the home of Draylen Mason, 17. The package exploded, killing Mason, and injuring his mother.

>>Austin package bombings: Friends remember victims Draylen Mason, Anthony House

The third bomb exploded when a 75-year-old Hispanic woman picked up a package on her front porch. She was seriously injured.
On Sunday, two men were hurt when a bomb went off apparently after one of the two hit a tripwire attached to the explosive device.

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>>For investigators, a race to decode hidden message in Austin bombings 

Authorities are operating under the assumption that the bombs were made by the same person.

Here is what we know about the Austin bomber’s habits: 

  • Prior to the explosion Sunday, the three bombs were left in packages at homes.
  • Sunday’s bomb was tripwire-activated.
  • Sunday’s bomb was in a different geographical area than the other three bombs.
  • The victims of the first three bombings were African-American and Hispanic. Sunday night’s victims were white.
  • Fred Burton, a security and terrorism analyst at Austin-based Stratfor, told the Austin American-Statesman that he believes it is the same person doing the bombing. He may have changed bombing locations and methods to throw investigators off, Burton said.
  • Common household items were used to construct the first three bombs, the American-Statesman reported. 
Interim Austin police chief Brian Manley, at podium, stands with Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives Special Agent in Charge Fred Milanowski, FBI Special Agent in Charge Christopher Combs, and Assistant police chief Troy Gay during a news conference near the site of Sunday's explosion, Monday, March 19, 2018, in Austin, Texas. Fear escalated across Texas' capital city on Monday after the fourth bombing this month, a blast that was triggered this time by a tripwire, demonstrating what police called a "higher level of sophistication" than the package bombs used in the previous attacks.  (Eric Gay/AP)

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