Cloudy skies could ruin your solar eclipse plans — Use this map to see how cloudy your Georgia city will be

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Cloudy skies could ruin your solar eclipse plans — Use this map to see how cloudy your Georgia city will be

Like millions of other Americans, you’re probably gearing up for the incredibly rare total solar eclipse crossing the continental United States in August.

While there are a variety of excellent viewpoints for you to catch the celestial event in all its glory, it all comes down to where you’ll find the clearest skies on Monday, Aug. 21, according to GreatAmericanEclipse.com.

To help, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration developed a map of predicted cloudiness on the day of the eclipse based on historical data.

NOAA researchers relied on 10 years of data collected from ground observations to create the Average Historical Cloudiness map for Aug. 21  indicating the average percentage of cloudiness in each area.

The darker the dot, the greater the chance for cloudiness at the hour of peak viewing during the total solar eclipse on August 21, 2017. Dots represent automated weather stations that reported the cloudiness data and show the 10-year cloudiness average for August 21, 2001–2010. Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Map developed by CICS-NC in cooperation with NOAA NCEI, Deborah Riddle.

They found coastal regions and areas east of the Mississippi River may be more susceptible to cloudier conditions on Aug. 21 compared to other areas.

NOAA also identified Rexburg, Idaho; Casper, Wyoming; Lincoln, Nebraska and Carbondale, Illinois as areas that historically experience clear skies during that time.

How “viewable” will the solar eclipse be in Georgia?

Screenshot of Atlanta cloudiness prediction from Interactive Eclipse Map developed by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Credit: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

If you want to be within the centerline path of the total solar eclipse in Georgia, which only grazes the northeast corner of the state, your best bet is to make your way to Rabun County, about two hours north of metro Atlanta.

There, the total solar eclipse will begin at 2:35 p.m. and last for 2 minutes and 40 seconds.

However, most areas in metro Atlanta will experience a partial eclipse. You can use this Google simulator to find out whether you’ll see a total eclipse.

Rome at 2:34 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 73 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Clear or few

Cartersville at 2:35 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 72.5 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Clear or few

Atlanta at 2:36 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 67.5 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Clear or few

Atlanta (near DeKalb Peachtree Airport, Brookhaven) at 2:36 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 68.1 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Clear or few

Atlanta (near Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport) at 2:36 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 42.7 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Scattered or broken

Atlanta (Discovery Boulevard near Mableton) at 2:36 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 66.1 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Few

Peachtree City at 2:36 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 67.5 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Clear

Columbus at 2:37 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 63 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Broken or overcast

Gainesville at 2:37 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 65.9 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Clear, few or broken

Athens at 2:38 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 70.7 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Clear or few

Macon at 2:39 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 68.5 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Clear, few or broken

Warner Robins at 2:40 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 54.1 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Scattered or broken

Albany at 2:40 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 60.5 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Scattered or broken

Augusta (near Daniel Field Airport) at 2:41 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 71.2 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Clear or few

Augusta (near Augusta regional airport) at 2:42 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 74.9 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Clear or few

Valdosta at 2:43 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 42.7 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Broken

Savannah at 2:45 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 52.6 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Broken, scattered or few

Savannah (near Hunter Army Airfield) at 2:46 p.m.

Viewable percentage: 41.5 percent

Typical cloud conditions: Broken


Another map created by researchers at the University of Idaho shows the likeliness of having totally clear skies on Aug. 21.

The Clear Sky Probability Map, developed by University of Idaho researchers. College of Natural Resources, University of Idaho

Based on historical data used for the map, the western United States (mostly colored in blue hues) has the highest chance of experiencing clear skies.

However, as the eclipse travels east, viewing conditions will get worse, according to researchers at the university’s College of Natural Resources.

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