Jackets look to technology to improve shooting

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Jackets look to technology to improve shooting

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Julie Jacobson
Georgia Tech guard Josh Okogie (5) puts up a shot against Pittsburgh forward Jamel Artis (1) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in the first round of the ACC tournament, Tuesday, March 7, 2017, in New York. Pittsburgh won 61-59. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)

A couple of steps behind the free-throw line, Josh Okogie tossed up soft jumpers in the sunlit gym at Georgia Tech’s Zelnak Basketball Center. A computerized voice provided immediate feedback on the angle of his shots as they descended on the basket.

“Forty-three. Forty-four. Forty-six,” spoke the voice as Okogie fed a series of shots through the rim.

For the Yellow Jackets’ oft errant shooting, a technological aid arrived last month, a $5,000 shot-tracking system that measures shot angle, left/right deviation, depth, position on the court and whether the shot scored. Using a sensor suspended 13 feet above the basket, the system logs data for individual players and can provide information served in charts, diagrams and heat maps, accessible on a wall-mounted television in the gym or remotely from a laptop or smartphone.

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