Georgia still hasn’t shared data with Trump’s voter fraud panel

0

Georgia still hasn’t shared data with Trump’s voter fraud panel

View CaptionHide Caption
David Barnes
AJ Seger, center right, 2, stands at a voting machine while his mother Mindy Seger, far left, 38, casts her ballot at Mt. Zion United Methodist Church in Marietta, Georgia, on Tuesday, April 18, 2017. Cobb, Fulton and North DeKalb residents cast ballots today for the highly contested 6th Congressional District race. (DAVID BARNES / DAVID.BARNES@AJC.COM)

Georgia has still not released public voter data to President Donald Trump’s national commission on election integrity, with officials saying they have not heard back from the panel over a requirement that it pay a standard $250 fee for the information.

Trump convened the commission in May to investigate unsubstantiated claims of “millions” of illegal votes in last year’s presidential election, and it made waves last month when it sent letters to all 50 states requesting their voter-roll data, including name, address, date of birth, party affiliation, last four Social Security number digits and voting history.

Under state law, some — but not all — of the information requested by Trump’s voter fraud panel is already publicly available, but the Georgia Secretary of State’s Office requires a $250 payment to collect the information and burn it to a data disc. Officials in the office said they are treating the panel’s request no different than a typical public records request, and are requiring payment of the fee before the state will process the information.

State law allows information such as voter names, addresses, race and gender, among other data points, to be included on the list. Georgia will not share information considered private under state law such as registered voters’ driver’s license numbers and Social Security numbers. Since the ballot is secret, there are no records that show who a person voted for in any election.

The panel had asked states to hold off on sending anything while a federal judge considered a request for a temporary restraining order against it, but the judge on Monday denied the order. The ruling cleared the way for the panel to resume collecting information.

View Comments 0

Weather and Traffic