Where is Hurricane Irma now? Track Irma’s path as it moves through Florida

Hurricane Irma has continued to shift west and is now threatening the western coast of Florida, with its path potentially taking it over parts of Georgia after it moves up the coast of Florida. The hurricane regained strength to a Category 4 storm Sunday as it hit the Florida Keys. 

The northern eyewall of the storm reached the Keys just before 7:30 a.m. as a Category 4 hurricane.

Almost 500,000 households were without power in Florida, and nearly 7 million people were under evacuation orders by Saturday night as the storm moved from Cuba into the Florida Straits.

Last week, as a Category 5 storm, Irma killed at least 10 people and injured 23 in the Caribbean islands, left nearly 60 percent of the island of Barbuda’s population homeless and left 900,000 people in Puerto Rico without power.

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» RELATED: Hurricane Irma: High winds, heavy rain possible in Atlanta

While Miami is no longer in the path of the eye of Hurricane Irma, it is experiencing strong winds and heavy rain, with damage reported Sunday morning. 

» RELATED: What is a Category 5 hurricane and what does it do?

The Washington Post has combined four live feeds in South Florida to track the storm as it moves through the region:

» RELATED: Hurricane Irma: Do you live in a hurricane evacuation zone?

Web cams in Naples were showing rain and wind by noon on Sunday.

Tampa  authorities are urging residents to head to shelter as they expect Hurricane Irma to strike Sunday afternoon.

» RELATED: Delta, Southwest cancel flights due to Hurricane Irma

The Tampa Bay Times is streaming from St. Petersburg, Florida, which is under a curfew as the storm approaches.

Sarasota:

For the latest updates on Hurricane Irma, follow the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Weather Service and  National Hurricane Center on Facebook.

You can also see Irma’s movement via satellite on NASA’s Hurricane Web Page:

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