What You Need to Know: Lori Loughlin

‘Full House’ actress Lori Loughlin fights new charges in college bribery case

Loughlin and her husband filed court documents Friday

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Lawyers for Loughlin and Mossimo Giannulli filed court documents Friday saying the couple plans to plead not guilty to charges of conspiracy to commit federal program bribery. The couple also waived their right to appear at a Nov. 20 arraignment.

Prosecutors recently added the bribery charge for 11 parents who previously pleaded not guilty in the case. Another 19 parents have pleaded guilty or agreed to plead guilty.

Loughlin and Giannulli are accused of paying $500,000 to get their two daughters into the University of Southern California as fake athletic recruits. Their daughters no longer attend USC.

FILE - In this April 3, 2019, file photo, actress Lori Loughlin, front, and husband, clothing designer Mossimo Giannulli, left, leave federal court in Boston after facing charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. Lawyers for Loughlin and Giannulli filed court documents Friday, Nov. 1, saying the couple plans to plead not guilty to charges of conspiracy to commit federal program bribery. The couple also waived their right to appear at a Nov. 20 arraignment.
Photo: AP Photo/Steven Senne, File

Last week, a grand jury in Boston indicted  Loughlin, Giannuli and nine other parents on new charges of trying to bribe officials at an organization that receives at least $10,000 in federal funding.

»RELATED: Lori Loughlin, 15 others face new conspiracy

The charge of conspiracy to commit federal program bribery carries a maximum sentence of up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $250,000.

Actress Felicity Huffman was released on Oct. 25, from a federal prison in California two days before the end of a two-week sentence for her role in the college admissions scandal, authorities said.

The scheme, the biggest college admissions case ever prosecuted by the Justice Department, has shown how far some will go to get their children into top universities like Stanford and Yale.

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