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Goop under fire for giving tips on how to achieve 'leanest livable weight'

Goop, they did it again.

Gwyneth Paltrow‘s lifestyle website is facing a new bout of criticism after publishing an interview with Traci Mann, Ph.D. about “why diets don’t work, the roll of willpower, and achieving your leanest livable weight.”

Your ‘leanest livable weight’ is the weight at the low end of your ‘set range,’ ” Mann says in the article. “Your set range is a genetically determined range of weight that your body generally keeps you in, despite your efforts to escape it.”

“For many of us, our leanest livable weight is heavier than our dream weight,” Mann continued. “I urge people to aim for their leanest livable weight, rather than below it. Embrace it — it’s where your body wants you to be, it’s easy to maintain, and you can be healthy there. Since this weight is within your set weight range — where your body tries to keep you — the only reason you would need to diet is if you’re currently well above that range. Otherwise, using sensible strategies should get and keep you there.”

While Mann clarifies her statement, saying she does not encourage calorie deprivation because it leads to eventual weight gain, the phrase “leanest livable weight” was triggering for fans on Twitter.

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One called the article “how to be as thin as possible without dying.”

Another asked, “WTF is wrong with you people?!” while someone else wrote, “How about encouraging women and girls to be a healthy weight?”

But Goop had a few defenders as well.

“You people are trolls who didn’t even read the article!” one wrote, telling those asking Goop to stop, “Yeah! Stop interviewing sincere people who tell us to eat vegetables! Vegetables are the devil. Shame… As if they are good for humans or something…”

While Goop hasn’t responded to PEOPLE’s request for comment, this isn’t the first time the site has been criticized for its content.

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In December, the brand defended itself against detractors who claimed it endorsed a potentially harmful extreme diet after publishing weight loss advice from celebrity fitness guru Tracy Anderson. In the piece, Anderson suggested that readers wanting to jump-start weight loss should work out every day while adopting a gluten-free, low-carb diet and using her protein bars as meal replacements for weight loss and weight management.

We would never advocate for an unhealthy diet or extreme routine,” a representative for the company told E! News. “As Tracy said in the interview, you should make choices based on what is best for your individual body.”

In August, watchdog group Truth in Advertising (TINA) went after the site for “deceptive” health claims on more than 50 of their products — saying that they the were investigating Goop’s marketing tactics and found that “the company claims, either expressly or implicitly, that its products (or those it promotes) can treat, cure, prevent, alleviate the symptoms of, or reduce the risk of developing a number of ailments.”

Goop has refuted the claims.

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