Your insider’s guide to Atlanta Center for Civil and Human Rights

What is the National Center for Civil and Human Rights?.The National Center for Civil and Human Rights is a museum and a human rights organization that “inspires people to tap their own power to change the world around them.”.Opened in 2014, the late civil rights leader Evelyn Lowery and former United Nations Ambassador Andrew Young thought up The Center.Former Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin launched the facility. .The facility is meant to educate visitors on the ties between the U.S. civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s and the modern effort to obtain human rights globally.The museum is located at 100 Ivan Allen Jr. Boulevard on land donated by The Coca-Cola Company

Atlanta and history go hand-in-hand, so it’s no surprise that the Peach State’s capital city is home to the National Center for Civil and Human Rights.

A museum and a human rights organization, this facility “inspires people to tap their own power to change the world around them.”

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Before you head to the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, this is what you need to know.

Visitors stroll through the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, which held its grand opening celebration Monday. The ceremony included speeches and a choir, which concluded the ceremony with a performance of "We Shall Overcome". BOB ANDRES / BANDRES@AJC.COM
Visitors stroll through the National Center for Civil and Human Rights, which held its grand opening celebration Monday. The ceremony included speeches and a choir, which concluded the ceremony with a performance of "We Shall Overcome". BOB ANDRES / BANDRES@AJC.COM

Credit: Bob Andres

Credit: Bob Andres

Location: 100 Ivan Allen Jr. Blvd., Atlanta, Ga. 30313 in downtown Atlanta.

Where should you park? The World of Coca-Cola parking deck at 126 Ivan Allen Jr. Blvd., Atlanta, Ga. 30313 is the closest available parking to the Center. It costs $12 per vehicle for 0-4 hours and $17 per vehicle for 4 or more hours. You can also part in the Georgia Aquarium parking deck, which you can get to using the address, 357 Luckie Street, NW Atlanta, Ga. 30313. It costs $12 for nonmembers.

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Hours: The Center is open from noon to 5 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Sunday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. The last entry is at 4 p.m. daily.

Ticket Prices: For individual tickets, general admission is $16 for adults, youth and seniors. Tickets are nonrefundable. Group tickets are also available.

What is the best way to get cheap tickets? Group tickets offer some of the cheapest prices for educational visits. Ticket deals have been offered throughout the year. CityPass can be a good deal too, especially if out of town guests are planning to hit a few tourist hot spots.

When is the best time to visit? Crowds are at their lowest levels from Aug. 1- Sept. 1. On weekdays throughout the year, the crowd dwindles as closing time nears (no entry after 4 p.m.). Be sure to review the COVID-19 guidelines if visiting amid the pandemic.

The Center for Human and Civil Rights is shown in Atlanta, Georgia, on Wednesday, March 14, 2018. The center looks at the intersection of the local story of the civil rights movement and the ongoing national story of the evolution of human rights. AJC file
The Center for Human and Civil Rights is shown in Atlanta, Georgia, on Wednesday, March 14, 2018. The center looks at the intersection of the local story of the civil rights movement and the ongoing national story of the evolution of human rights. AJC file

When is the Center the busiest? Fridays and Saturdays are always the busiest days at the Center.

How much time does it take to experience the Center? Be sure to enter before 4 p.m. to gain entry. Leave at least 90 minutes to experience the museum fully.

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What type of bag can you bring in with you? Luggage and backpacks are permitted, but there is no storage area for personal belongings. Visitors must keep their items with them at all times.

Can you bring food in with you? Food is permitted in the atrium, where parents may feed babies, but not in the galleries. The gift shop sells snacks. Chewing gum, candy and water bottles are not allowed in the galleries.

Visitors stroll through the National Center for Civil and Human Rights on Monday during its grand opening. BOB ANDRES / BANDRES@AJC.COM
Visitors stroll through the National Center for Civil and Human Rights on Monday during its grand opening. BOB ANDRES / BANDRES@AJC.COM

Credit: Bob Andres

Credit: Bob Andres

Are strollers welcome? Children in single strollers are welcome in the Center’s galleries but during particularly busy attendance times, stroller use may be limited. “Front-facing baby carriers are permitted and encouraged.”

Is photography allowed? The Center allows “private, non-commercial use only.” Photography is not allowed within “Voice to the Voiceless: The Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr., Collection.” Be sure to be mindful of the visitors around you when attempting to photograph and record video. No flash photography is allowed.

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Where is the best place to take a selfie? The Center suggests three locations: the front lobby at the Paula Scher Mural, the Fountain outside and in front of the MLK mural near the second floor stairs.

What else do you need to know? The Center says, “People are always curious about the event spaces we offer. The Center provides a unique venue space that accommodates everything from corporate events and conferences, to weddings, holiday parties and intimate dinners. Anyone may rent the entire facility, including our exhibit spaces, or simply utilize our state-of-the-art Special Event Room and Pre-Function Lobby.”

Insider tip: Before you visit the Center, check out their social media accounts to see what you can expect. You can follow them on Instagram and Twitter at @ctr4chr and Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/ctr4chr/

For more information visit www.civilandhumanrights.org.

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