Poll: Majority of white Americans feel discriminated against

  • Charles Ventura
  • USA TODAY
10:18 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017 Atlanta News

A majority of white Americans believe discrimination exists against them in the United States, according to a recent poll.

The poll, conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, found that 55 percent of whites surveyed believe that "discrimination against white people exists in the U.S. today.”          

Of those white Americans surveyed, only a small percentage said they've experienced discrimination firsthand. 

Among whites, 19 percent said they've "been personally discriminated against" because of their race when applying for jobs, while 11 percent said it occurred when applying to or while at college. Thirteen percent of whites said they experienced discrimination when being considered for equal pay or promotion at work.         

According to NPR, income seemed to "affect individual responses to the question of discrimination," with those making less money "more likely to say that whites are discriminated against."           

The survey's findings come as President Donald Trump faces wide criticism over his administration's policies toward minority groups and his response to the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.         

Part of the "Discrimination in America" series, the report also surveyed African-Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans and LGBTQ adults. They were asked about their "own personal experiences with discrimination," with 92 percent of African-Americans surveyed saying they believe "that discrimination against African-Americans exists in America today."         

The comprehensive report’s other findings:

The poll, which sampled 3,453 adults, 902 of whom were white, was conducted Jan. 26-April 9, 2017.

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