Fulton considers adding more arts classes at two high schools

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Tri-Cities High School students Christopher Kelly (left), and Marc Fleming play trumpet during a Jazz Ensemble rehearsal in May. The school’s visual and performing arts magnet program was launched in 1990. KENT D. JOHNSON /KDJOHNSON@AJC.COM

Fulton considers adding more arts classes at two high schools

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Tri-Cities High School students Christopher Kelly (left), and Marc Fleming play trumpet during a Jazz Ensemble rehearsal in May. The school’s visual and performing arts magnet program was launched in 1990. KENT D. JOHNSON /KDJOHNSON@AJC.COM

Fulton County school officials last week discussed plans to add three music technology courses at Centennial high school and three painting and drawing classes at Riverwood high school.

In recent years, many Georgia public schools have attempted to add more arts classes and arts-related activities to their curriculum, citing data that shows students in arts classes and programs perform better academically.

“I believe we are seeing a positive shift,” said Pamela Walker, executive director of ArtsNow, a non-profit that has been working with some Georgia public schools on helping teachers learn how to use the arts to educate students in math, science and other subjects.

However, a number of schools have cut arts classes and programs, largely citing a lack of money.

Fulton County launched arts magnet programs at two high schools – Tri-Cities and North Springs Charter – in 1990. A school district spokeswoman said Fulton currently has no plans to add any arts-themed schools, but said the district is working on a plan to add more choice programs for schools.

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